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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 1:12 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 12:00 pm
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Location: Rheged
I always thought it a little inappropriate that Donskmál had such a huge influence on my region's place-names and local dialect vocabulary that we aren't taught any of it. I mean, Norse, as far as I'm concerned is the language of the landscape, at least most recently.
I think a revival of Old Norse would have little purpose, but I think it would be nice to have more emphasis on the language, I thought about maybe creating a website for phrases in Old Norse with pictures of Cumbria and Yorkshire and the Isle of Man etc Very Happy Any ideas?


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 Post subject: List of norse words
PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 2:48 pm 
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Hej Yeti, some time i ago i sended Hnolt (ljun / Goto) at list of norse words in english.

I also wrote an assigment about the norse impact on english.
I can send you that if you post your mail here

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Hrafnsmærki skal væifa í vindinum á ný aftr, Þat sum es in sanna Danibrók!


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 10:32 pm 
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Hi Yeti, good to see you here Wink

I've been searching for an Old Norse map of Dublin online (I'm sure it exists), but without luck, so I've been considering creating one myself in lack of better Confused


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 11:07 pm 
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I talked about norse loan words and place names in my assigment, there is three pages of links.

Here is one of them i remember:
http://www.viking.no/

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Hrafnsmærki skal væifa í vindinum á ný aftr, Þat sum es in sanna Danibrók!


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2011 1:55 am 
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The norse language in Normandy have certainly a lot of cummon patterns with Anglo-norse.
The arguments are that nouns that we found in place names are from celtic origin (njállhólmr -> Néhou), and anglo-norse origin (*bretakollvilla > Britecolvilla > Brectouville).

My own name (I won't cite, to preserve my datas, sorry) is typical from Normandy. Is it norse ? Not directly, it's germanic. But which link between Normandy and Germany ? No one. And where can we find this name in other european areas ? In Lancashire. So we have a link Germany-Lancashire-Normandy. Typically a viking way, isn't it ? Wink
My name is from germanic origin, but I guess, my parents were allready norsemen at this time (maybe some slaves ?).

That's why I think Anglo-norse and the norse language in Normandy are quite the same.

So, norse in Normandy maybe had some final /-u/ which fell in old icelandic, and certainly had final or preconsonantic /w/, as in anglo norse skiw for ský.
One argument in this way : the norman french word "mauve" [mauv] (gull). That's mǫ́ʀ/máʀ in old norse. So, where the /v/ comes from ? Don't forget that the PGerm form is *maihwaz. And here have we the /w/. So I guess the form in Norse in Normandy was *máwʀ, as in anglo-norse.

That's why if you have more informations about anglo-norse, tell me more !


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 12:27 am 
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Hej, i am Hrafn ^^
I've been on a breake in order to finnish school, which i have now.

You sound like a man who know languages, that is a skill of high value here :b
I know about the vikings and Normandy, but i only thought it left some norse words in the vocabulary.

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Hrafnsmærki skal væifa í vindinum á ný aftr, Þat sum es in sanna Danibrók!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 12:04 pm 
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Nice to meet you Smile

Yes, they left some words. Not so much, but there is an influence. The problem is that some philologists of the XIXth century saw everywhere norse roots in the norman french vocabulary. They were not right. Now people say that the influence is very little. I think, that the reality is somewhere between these two opinions. It's very difficult to say what is from norse language, and what is from frankish or old saxonian.

But the most interesting material (I think) is the place names, because we have more old texts which present ancient forms. That's confortable. And there is a lot of norse place names... For exemple my ancestries village is Annebecq (old : Asnebek) which meant certainly Ásleikbekkr (it's cummonly accepted).

I think to reconstruct Old norse in Normandy, both these materials have to be used. But very carefully Smile


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 3:57 pm 
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It would be danish old norse.

I do some research in east norse some times. Maybe i should take a look on the norse left overs in Normandy

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Hrafnsmærki skal væifa í vindinum á ný aftr, Þat sum es in sanna Danibrók!


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 7:16 pm 
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Not only... In fact there is east norse in the eastern Normandy, and west norse in western Normandy. But a few...


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:25 pm 
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Hi Lundtrollinn, thanks for an interesting introduction! I have to admit I know practically nothing about Old Norse influences in Normandy.
Lundtrollinn wrote:
One argument in this way : the norman french word "mauve" [mauv] (gull). That's mǫ́ʀ/máʀ in old norse. So, where the /v/ comes from ? Don't forget that the PGerm form is *maihwaz. And here have we the /w/. So I guess the form in Norse in Normandy was *máwʀ, as in anglo-norse.
Old Norse often had -v- in már (máfr,mávr) which came analogically from dative: mávi/máfi and plural: mávar.


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